The Irish and their time keeping
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The Irish and their time keeping

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We've all done it. You've just told your mate you're in the taxi, but really you're still in the shower. Or, you're 'on the way' and you've just rolled over for a ten minute snooze. Again.

Time is a funny old thing and we never seem to have as much of it as we want – especially if there's a deadline just around the corner.

But how bad are we really? And which county is the worst for timekeeping and which one is the best? EBS set out to answer those questions once and for all in our 'Big Survey of Irish Time'.*

How is our timekeeping?

Well, it turns out we're a fairly mixed bag when it comes to timekeeping and being punctual or fashionably (and not so fashionably!) late.

You know in your CV how you say you're always punctual? Well, 33% of you are telling a tall-tale. EBS's survey found that 34% of people are always early, while 33% of us are generally bang on time.

That's not bad going, if we do say so. Only 28% would say they're sometimes late, while the stragglers at 5% reckon you'll be lucky to see them when you see them (!).

What county is the worst offender?

It's official: Kilkenny is the most punctual county in Ireland. They're so punctual in fact that 67% of them are always early. Steady on! A whopper 100% of Cavan people are always right on time – so if you value timekeeping, make sure your friends are from these counties.

As for the late-comers, Galwegians admit to being late nearly half of the time – so there'd better be plenty of watches filling stockings in Galway this Christmas.

Bold as the Galwegians are, the title for worst timekeepers goes to Monaghan where 33% of them are always late and take the pretty lax attitude of 'you'll see me when you see me'.

So if you're from Kilkenny and you're eyeing someone up from Monaghan, you'd better make sure that timekeeping isn't too important to you – otherwise, there might be plenty of arguments about cold dinners.

And how do we feel about lateness?

So how do we feel about the chancers who are always late? Do we forgive them, or are we secretly fuming? Well, the Irish are not terribly chuffed by lateness, to say the least:

• 52% are a bit put out.
• 5% of us take no prisoners and head home.
• Lads are twice as likely to leave, at 6% compared to 3% of women.
• We're a fairly relaxed bunch, us Irish, and that's reflected in the stats with 35% saying we're okay with a bit of lateness.
• The final 8% say they're actually relieved when a friend or other half is late because they're usually late too (probably all from Monaghan!)

So there you have it: women are worse at timekeeping, men are less likely to put up with lateness, and if you're from Monaghan, it's time to pull your socks up and start being on time.

To get all the insights into Irish time and to check how your county-people compared, head over to the infographic and full report.

Want a mortgage provider that really understands Irish people and how important your time is?

At EBS, we'll meet you anytime to discuss a mortgage. When we say anytime, we really do mean anytime – in a mo, a min, evenings, weekends, even in a donkey's year. This inspired us to explore Irish people's unique relationship with time in the 'Big Survey of Irish Time'*. Why not arrange a friendly chat with one of our mortgage advisors now?

* To find out when was the best time to meet for our Irish customers, EBS surveyed just over 1,000 respondents from a nationally representative sample of the Irish population on the 15h August 2015.

The content of this blog is expressed in broad terms and is limited to general information purposes only. Readers should always seek professional advice to address issues arising in specific contexts and not seek to rely on the information in this blog which does not constitute any form of advice or recommendation by EBS d.a.c.

EBS d.a.c. neither accepts nor assumes any responsibility in relation to the contents of this blog and excludes all warranties, undertakings and representations (either express or implied) to the fullest extent permitted under applicable law.

EBS d.a.c. is regulated by the Central Bank of Ireland.

 


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